Architecture Course Description

For Description of Art & Design Foundation (ADF) Courses

INT 202 Space-Form Design (0,8;4 cr.)

A design studio intended for Architecture, Interior Design and Furniture Design students. It focuses on the development of analytical and technical skills for perceiving, understanding and manipulating spatial definitions and relationships within a habitable context. It includes a discussion into the nature of human experience and perception of built form as the basis for design, an examination of the process of design and an introduction into the “vocabulary” of form. Students are called upon to design a series of small-scale projects. Prerequisites: ADF 101

ARC 203 Architecture Design I (0,8;4 cr.)

This design studio emphasizes on construction materials as a major design determinant. Projects of more complex programs are introduced. Intended to be developed are skills of conceptualization, manipulation of spatial and architectural elements, and observation of freehand and technical representation. Prerequisites: INT 202

ARC 304 Architecture Design II (0,8;4 cr.)

These two design studios of fall third year and fall fourth year are combined in one vertical design studio.  Topics for thematic design studios are posted at the beginning of the fall semester. Students select different topics and are divided into respective groups. Thematic topics address architectural and urban issues of distinct cultural dimensions. ARC 203 is prerequisite for ARC 304, and ARC 305 is prerequisite for ARC406

ARC 406 Architecture Design IV (0,8;4 cr.)

These two design studios of fall third year and fall fourth year are combined in one vertical design studio.  Topics for thematic design studios are posted at the beginning of the fall semester. Students select different topics and are divided into respective groups. Thematic topics address architectural and urban issues of distinct cultural dimensions. ARC 203 is prerequisite for ARC 304, and ARC 305 is prerequisite for ARC406

ARC 305 Architecture Design III (0,8;4 cr.)

These two design studios of spring third year and spring fourth year are combined in one vertical design studio.  Topics for thematic design studios are posted at the beginning of the spring semester. Students select different topics and are divided into respective groups. Thematic topics address architectural and urban issues of distinct cultural dimensions. ARC 304 is prerequisite for ARC 305, and ARC 406 is prerequisite for ARC407

ARC 407 Architecture Design V (0,8;4 cr.)

These two design studios of spring third year and spring fourth year are combined in one vertical design studio.  Topics for thematic design studios are posted at the beginning of the spring semester. Students select different topics and are divided into respective groups. Thematic topics address architectural and urban issues of distinct cultural dimensions. ARC 304 is prerequisite for ARC 305, and ARC 406 is prerequisite for ARC407

ARC 306 Final Project Design (1,8;5 cr.)

This course is for students studying for the BFA degree in architecture. It is a culmination of design studio where students integrate their knowledge and skills in a comprehensive final research and design project of their choice. The same project is also developed and detailed in the course Architecture Execution Drawings of the same semester. Prerequisites: ARC 304

ARC 508 Final Project Design I (2,4;4 cr.)

This course is for students studying for the BArch degree in architecture.  The course conceived within a research-oriented studio/workshop model in which students are expected to critically explore architectural issues of personal interest and of general importance to the discipline, and to present their findings in a research report and preliminary design proposal. Prerequisites: ARC 407

ARC 509 Final Project Design II (0,10;5 cr.)

A culmination of design studio in which students are expected to integrate and synthesize acquired knowledge and skills and to develop both the theoretical and practical components of the research and design project proposed in Final Project Design I intended for students studying for the BArch degree in architecture. Prerequisites: ARC 508

ARC 215 Wood and Metal Shop (0,4;2 cr.)

This is a laboratory course for inducting students into the safe operation of hand tools, power tools, stationary machinery, and other equipment for the fabrication and finishing of design models and prototypes. Instructional demonstrations of workshop techniques are followed by “hands- on” student exercises, using a variety of modeling materials, including timber, metals, and plastics. Successful completion of this course is required before students will be allowed to use the Wood and Metal Shop for their design studio projects.

ARC 316 Surveying (0,4;2 cr.)

This course is an introduction to topographic mapping and route surveying. Field work is an essential part of the course where students work individually and in groups on actual sites.

ARC 315/417 Architecture Execution Drawings (0,6;3 cr.)

In this course students will be responsible for the preparation of a full set of architectural working drawings for the execution of a mid-size building or project. The course will also cover the basics of preparing a specifications document. Prerequisites: ARC 203

ARC 222 Principles of Design (2,0;2 cr.)

This course is given to design students in architecture, interior design, furniture design and industrial design. It considers design thinking and clarifies the design process linking the stages with established design methodologies. Discussions and assignments address the design journey from image to object, concepts of form, function and context, notions of design constraints, systems and types, and the importance of geometry and grids in design development.

ARC 223 Ancient and Medieval Art & Architecture (3,0;3 cr.)

The course traces the origins and development of architecture, artifacts and urbanism since pre-historic times till the fourteenth century. Products of east and west civilizations are addressed including the Greeks, Romans, Byzantine, Umayyad, Abbasid, Fatimid, Romanesque, Gothic, Ayyubid and Mamluk. Emphasis is on analytical study of developments, artists and monuments, with less concern in objects and more attention to issues of cultural production, ideology and socio-political significance.

ARC 224 Renaissance and Modern Art & Architecture (3,0;3 cr.)

This course surveys art, architecture and the city from the fourteenth to the twentieth century. It starts with the Renaissance and Baroque in Europe, to the three great empires of the East, the Ottoman, Safavid and Moghul empires emphasizing cultural encounters and contact between East and West. It ends with the tracing of western cultural development between 1760 and 1945 addressing the contributing political, aesthetic, institutional and cultural forces that shaped the Modern period. Prerequisites: ARC 223

ARC 325 Contemporary Architecture (3,0;3 cr.)

This course addresses current architectural production and discourse in view of the phenomena in the field since the Second World War. Prerequisites: ARC 224

ARC 326 Regional Architecture (0,6;3 cr.)

This course involves an analytical and historical survey of the regional architectural heritage with focus on the domestic architecture of Lebanon: vernacular, traditional and modern. A field workshop addresses selected sites for the analysis and documentation of built form with emphasis on the role of climate, topography, typology, building technology and other factors contributing to setting and morphology.

ARC 427 Urbanism (3,0;3 cr.)

This course deals with basic principles and current issues about contemporary urbanism. Special attention will be paid to the relationships among forces acting upon the city, descriptive and critical theories of urbanism, and contemporary approaches to urban design. 

ARC 428 Landscape Architecture (3,0;3 cr.)

The course includes an overview of landscape design with a survey of the ideas, principles and practical considerations behind the landscape design cases under study, from the classical to the modern period. Students address an actual landscape design project or competition, either within the format of a regular term project, or as a series of intensive workshops.

ARC 231 Introduction to Computer Aided Design (1,4;3 cr.)

The course addresses space planning and design applications in computer aided design and graphics. Students learn digital tools and techniques to deal with a whole range of applications from conceptual diagrams to detailed representations of objects and spaces. It includes an introduction to 3-D surface and solid modeling and rendering.

ARC 332 Architecture Internship I (1,0;1 cr.)

The purpose of these one-credit courses is to provide an opportunity for students to gain off-campus experience in the discipline and profession of Architecture. Each student is required to undertake a total of twenty four weeks of activity divided into three periods with the minimum single period of approved activity being eight weeks. The preferred activity is to work under the supervision of a registered architect for the twenty four week period. For students to achieve a satisfactory assessment they must provide documented evidence of undertaking the preferred activity. Students can provide evidence of their work by submitting a signed letter from their supervising registered architect outlining the dates and period of time they were employed, their responsibilities and the activities/projects they have been engaged in. On completion of the subject requirements students are required to submit the selected documentation to the assigned faculty committee. Students are required to document these activities in accordance with guidelines issued by the committee. The Faculty reserves the right to disallow any activities as meeting the requirements for this course, for which prior approval has not been obtained in writing.

ARC 433 Architecture Internship II (1,0;1 cr.)

The purpose of these one-credit courses is to provide an opportunity for students to gain off-campus experience in the discipline and profession of Architecture. Each student is required to undertake a total of twenty four weeks of activity divided into three periods with the minimum single period of approved activity being eight weeks. The preferred activity is to work under the supervision of a registered architect for the twenty four week period. For students to achieve a satisfactory assessment they must provide documented evidence of undertaking the preferred activity. Students can provide evidence of their work by submitting a signed letter from their supervising registered architect outlining the dates and period of time they were employed, their responsibilities and the activities/projects they have been engaged in. On completion of the subject requirements students are required to submit the selected documentation to the assigned faculty committee. Students are required to document these activities in accordance with guidelines issued by the committee. The Faculty reserves the right to disallow any activities as meeting the requirements for this course, for which prior approval has not been obtained in writing.

ARC 534 Architecture Internship III (1,0;1 cr.)

The purpose of these one-credit courses is to provide an opportunity for students to gain off-campus experience in the discipline and profession of Architecture. Each student is required to undertake a total of twenty four weeks of activity divided into three periods with the minimum single period of approved activity being eight weeks. The preferred activity is to work under the supervision of a registered architect for the twenty four week period. For students to achieve a satisfactory assessment they must provide documented evidence of undertaking the preferred activity. Students can provide evidence of their work by submitting a signed letter from their supervising registered architect outlining the dates and period of time they were employed, their responsibilities and the activities/projects they have been engaged in. On completion of the subject requirements students are required to submit the selected documentation to the assigned faculty committee. Students are required to document these activities in accordance with guidelines issued by the committee. The Faculty reserves the right to disallow any activities as meeting the requirements for this course, for which prior approval has not been obtained in writing.

ARC 241 Building Systems I (3,0;3 cr.)

This course is about statics and mechanics of solids: an introduction to vector forces and moments, equilibrium of rigid bodies in 2-D, free-body diagrams, frames and machines, center of gravity and moment of inertia, design of trusses and beams, introduction to material properties, stress and strain, and normal, shearing and combined stresses.

ARC 242 Building Systems II (3,0;3 cr.)

This course is about analysis and design of structures. It addresses column design and buckling, physical properties of various construction materials: timber, steel, aluminum, copper and others, and deformation of structural elements under loads using moment area and conjugate beam methods. Included also are indeterminate structures by approximate methods, and design and selection of structural elements according to loads applied with practical assignments of selection and pre-dimensioning. Prerequisites: ARC 241

ARC 243 Building Technology I (3,0;3 cr.)

This is a course on the response of building envelopes to surrounding environmental factors, covering in detail all the components of the envelope: floors, walls, doors, windows, and roofs of all types. This course is also an introduction to construction detailing.

ARC 244 Building Technology II (3,0;3 cr.)

This is a combined lecture and studio course consisting of recent building technologies and all aspects of finishing work and materials, and the methods, contents, and presentation of professional construction documents including execution drawings, bills of quantity and specifications files. Prerequisites: ARC 243

ARC 345 Environmental Systems I (3,0;3 cr.)

The course aims at introducing the art, science and practice of building services engineering to the future architect or interior designer in all aspects of design, installation and maintenance. Included are sources and distribution of water, wastes and energy supplies, application of electrical power, lighting, hydraulics, vertical transport, and. air conditioning, heating and ventilating of buildings.

ARC 346 Advanced Building Systems (3,0;3 cr.)

This course is about analysis and design of concrete structures: mechanical properties, design of continuous beams in flexure and in shear, columns, footings, basement walls, retaining walls, structural walls, one-way solid slabs, one-way ribbed slabs, an introduction to two-way solid slabs, and staircases. Included is the design of a multi-story building with a detailed project. Prerequisites: ARC 242

ARC 347 Environmental Systems II (3,0;3 cr.)

This is a continuation of Environmental Systems I. It addresses energy management systems, solar collection, fire protection in buildings, security, telecommunications, and other advanced systems. Students will be able to undertake preliminary selection, sizing and space allocation of systems, and to translate them into space and planning requirements for complex buildings. Assignments include tutorial projects and/or field investigations. Prerequisites: ARC 345

ARC 348 Advanced Building Technology (3,0;3 cr.)

This course is about the analysis of high-tech construction systems such as steel-and-glass, as well as new systems and materials of construction with their properties and technical advantages. Focus is on the specific characteristics of each system/material and its compatibility with other materials, its physical treatment, as well as the different possibilities of its finishing, weathering and maintenance. Prerequisites: ARC 244

ARC 451 Construction Management (3,0;3 cr.)

A course on organizing construction projects; pre-construction activities; building and contracts; fundamentals of construction planning, monitoring and control; application of construction control tools; CPM, materials management, operations analysis and quality control.

ARC 452 Energy Efficient Design (3,0;3 cr.)

The course introduces students to the integrated design approach to low energy buildings and to the consideration of energy efficiency at all stages of design decision. The course defines and correlates the functions of the various building elements which effect low energy sustainability and make a building environmentally friendly.

ARC 553 Building and Urban Regulations (2,0;2 cr.)

The course is about a study of the local and regional building codes and urban regulations with introduction and comparison to other European systems. It investigates the effect of such laws and codes on the approach to urban and building design with regard to political, economic, social, technical, and environmental factors.

ARC 554 Business Practice for Building Design (2,0;2 cr.)

The course is an overview of the profession and an introduction to the legal system. It focuses on the client architect / interior designer agreement covering types of building contracts and methods of building procurement, aspects of the law of contract, contract documentation and specification writing techniques, and estimating, feasibilities, cost planning, scheduling, bill of quantities and budgeting.

ARC 011 Presentation Techniques (1,4;3 cr.)

The course addresses advanced techniques for pre-visualization and idea development, and practice techniques for evolving sketches into working drawings and rendered interior and exterior environments. The emphasis will be on expanding thinking and on communicating three-dimensional concepts into expressive and original two-dimensional worlds.

ARC 021 The Architecture of Tripoli (3,0;3 cr.)

The course covers an in-depth investigation of the architectural and urban forms and meanings in Tripoli, Lebanon, past and present. After a historical survey, typological case studies are addressed including field trips and site documentation exercises.

ARC 022 Islamic Architecture (3,0;3 cr.)

The course is a survey of the architectural heritage of the Islamic world from the early caliphate to the era of the Muslim superpowers in the pre-modern times. It traces the most significant and influential edifices of the Muslim world from Spain in the West to India in the East. Monuments will be studied and analyzed in their political, religious, socio-economic, cultural and aesthetic contexts. The course will also examine the evolution of building types such as mosques, madrasas, mausoleums, caravanserais and palaces.

ARC 023 The Islamic City (3,0;3 cr.)

This seminar is a quest for a historical framework for the Islamic City both as an urban phenomenon and as a modern analytical concept. It proposes an approach based on the relationship between architectural typology and urban form for the investigation of the morphology and sociology of cities in Islamic history. Through analysis of texts and architectural/archaeological data, the course will try to identify and examine the leading factors in shaping civic forms and structures in several model cities in the Islamic world from the Medina of the Prophet to pre-modern times.

ARC 031 Digital Modeling (1,4;3 cr.)

This course centers on advanced 3-D CAD, including surface and solid modeling, application of digital materials and lights, in addition to shading and ray-trace rendering.

ARC 032 AEC Packages (1,4;3 cr.)

This course exposes students to advanced CAD and AEC software packages including Architectural Desktop. Emphasis is on parametric and object-oriented tools that help in the digital design process.

ARC 033 GIS Technology (1,4;3 cr.)

This course provides an overview of the fundamental concepts and terminology and the role of GIS in business, government, surveying, and natural resources. The course will cover the collection, management, analysis and presentation of spatial data. Additional topics will include concepts of database systems, data modeling, and digital mapping. At the end of this course, the student should be able to create data in ArcView, to query and manipulate data, geocode addresses, perform spatial analysis, and produce map outputs and charts.

ARC 041 Smart Buildings (3,0;3 cr.)

The course explores the impact of networks, ubiquitous computing, and always-on connectivity within the design of everyday things, architecture and the city. Included are the basics of network theory, the social dimension of technological advances, and innovation in design and services.

ARC 051 Housing Issues (3,0;3 cr.)

This seminar takes two contrasting but contemporary approaches, historical understanding and phenomenological experience, to explore definitions of what we mean by the word home. Both planned and informal domestic architecture in the region are investigated as case studies.

ARC 052 Elements of Urban Planning (3,0;3 cr.)

A study of actual planning processes, issues and problems, urban and regional zoning, and demographical projections, with comparative studies of regional or international planning cases.