Engineering Course Description

ARAB 201 Introduction to Arabic Language (3,0;3 cr.)

The course aims to provide students with the necessary knowledge of Arabic, and motivates them to appreciate the different writing styles. Students should acquire grammatical skills and learn the theoretical expressions of the language. The focus is on developing the students’ oral and written skills.

(Prerequisite: Nil)

ENG 201 Academic English I (3,0;3 cr.)

The course develops students’ communication skills that are needed in an academic context. Students are offered instruction and training in analytical reading and writing of expository and argumentative texts and essays, as well as note-making, summarizing and outlining from readings.

(Prerequisite: TOEFL of 550 and above)

GHN 201 General Health and Nutrition (3,0;3 cr.)

A brief nutritional survey of nutrients, including their food sources, digestion, metabolism, functions, and requirements in humans. This course also includes recent topics.

(Prerequisite: IEP L8-9)

COMP 201 Computer Applications (2,2;3 cr.)

The course introduces the student to the microcomputer application packages which are available in the market and are needed by the student in his/her course of study. The main software applications covered are the Microsoft Office products such as word for word processing, Excel for designing use of spreadsheet, PowerPoint for presentation design.

(Prerequisite: ENG 014 & above)

CS 201 The Civilization & Cultures of the Ancient World (Cultural Studies I) (3,0;3 cr.)

The theme of this course is myths and ancient beliefs, and the cultural impact of ancient Egyptian, Mesopotamian, Phoenician, Greek, Christian and other civilizations.

(Prerequisite: ENG201)

MATH 202 Calculus III (3,0;3 cr.)

Techniques of integration; improper integrals. Infinite series; Taylor and Maclaurin series. Parameterized curves and polar coordinates; Graphing and integration in polar coordinates; Analytic geometry in space; Vector-valued functions; space curves, curvature. 

(Prerequisite: ENG 016 and above)

MATH 203 Calculus IV (3,0;3 cr.)

Analytical geometry in three dimensions.  Algebra and operations on vectors, Limits, continuity, derivatives of functions in several variables and Multiple Integrals. Vector calculus; functions of several variables; partial derivatives, gradients; extreme values and differentials of multivariate functions; multi integrals; line and surface integrals. 

(Prerequisite: MATH202)

MATH 222 Discrete Math (3,0;3 cr.)

Topics include: Sets, sequences and functions, elementary logic, relations, induction and recursion, counting, introduction to graphs and trees, recursion, trees, algorithms, digraphs, and finite-state machines.

(Prerequisite: ENG 016and above)

MATH 332 Linear Algebra (3,0;3 cr.)

Topics include systems of linear equations, matrices, determinants, vector spaces, linear transformations, eigenvectors and eigen values, inner-product spaces and orthogonality.

(Prerequisite: MATH202)

MATH 342 Ordinary Differential Equations (3,0;3 cr.)

Introduces first order differential equations, linear differential equations, homogenous and non-homogenous equations with constant coefficients, power series solutions, Bessel functions, Legendre polynomials, Laplace transforms, and initial value problems.

(Prerequisite: MATH202)

MATH 352 Probability and Statistics (3,0;3 cr.)

This course covers the basic principles of the theory of probability and statistics and their applications. topics include probability, conditional probability, random variables, expected values, specific discrete and continuous distributions, binomial, Poisson, geometric, Pascal, hyper geometric, uniform, exponential and normal processes.

(Prerequisite: MATH202)

MATH 442 Numerical Methods (3,0;3 cr.)

Approximations and round-off errors, truncation errors and Taylor series, roots of equations (bracketing methods, open methods, and roots of polynomials), Gauss Elimination and LU decomposition, and curve fitting (least-squares regression, interpolation, numerical differentiation and integration).

(Prerequisite: MATH202)

PHY 203 General Physics I: Mechanics (3,0;3 cr.)

Vector representation of forces and moments; general three-dimensional theorems of statics; free bodies; two-and three-dimensional statically determinate frames; centroids and moments of inertia of areas. Absolute motion of a particle; motion of rigid bodies; rotating axes and the Coriolis component of acceleration; Newton’s laws applied to translating and rotating rigid bodies; principles of work and energy and impulse and momentum in translation and rotation; moments of inertia of masses.

(Prerequisite MATH 202)

PHY 205 General Physics II: Electromagnetics and Optics (3,0;3 cr.)

Simple Harmonic Motion, oscillations, and waves. Charge, electric field, Gauss’ Law and potential. Capacitance, resistance, simple A/C and D/C circuits. Magnetic fields, Ampere’s Law, Faraday’s Law, and induction. Maxwell’ equations and electromagnetic waves.

(Prerequisite MATH 202, MATH 342)

PHY211 Material Science (3,0;3 cr.)

The behavior of materials under various conditions and environments is correlated to atomic and molecular structure and bonding. 

(Prerequisite: MATH 202, MATH 342)

PHY 223 General Physics III: Thermodynamics and Modern Physics (3,0;3 cr.)

Temperature, first and second laws of thermodynamics, kinetic theory and entropy. Gratings and spectra, polarization. Light and quantum physics, wave nature of matter, structure of the hydrogen atom. Atomic physics, electrical conduction in solids, nuclear physics and particle physics.

(Prerequisite MATH 202, MATH 342)

PHY200L Physics Lab (0,2;1 cr.)

The behavior of materials under various conditions and environments is correlated to atomic and molecular structure and bonding. 

(Prerequisite: 2 Physics courses)

ELEC221 Electric Circuits I (3,0;3 cr.)

The course covers dc and ac topics; Ohm’s law, energy and power, series and parallel circuits, circuit theorems, capacitors, inductors, transformers, RC and RL circuits, RLC circuits, Filters, circuit theorems in AC analysis, and pulse response of reactive circuits. 

(Prerequisite MATH202)

ELEC221L Electric Circuits I Lab (0,2;1 cr.)

This lab introduces basic test equipment: oscilloscopes, multi-meters, power supply, function generator, etc., and uses this equipment in various experiments on resistors, capacitors, and inductors.

(Co-requisite ELEC 221)

ELEC 223 Digital Fundamentals (3,0;3 cr.)

The course has three parts. The first one deals with numbering systems, Boolean algebra, minimization procedures including K-maps. The second part covers combinational logic functions using simple logic gates, Multiplexers, code converters, En/Decoders, and 555 timer. The last part covers sequential logic design; Flip Flops, Registers, counters and introduction to PLD devices and ABEL.

(Prerequisite MATH222)

ELEC 223L Digital Fundamentals Lab (0,2;3 cr.)

The experiments will cover the fundamentals of simple digital gates, combinational logic circuits, and sequential logic circuits. The Lab will include testing, troubleshooting, simulation and design of digital circuits.

(Co-requisite ELEC 223)

ELEC290 Electrical Circuits II (3,0;3 cr.)

Analysis of electrical circuits in both the time and the frequency domains. Network theorems, impulse response, convolution differential equations and second-order transient response. LaPlace, z, and Fourier transform analysis of electrical circuits. Prerequisites ELEC221, and MATH 342

ELEC 330 Electronic Circuits I (3,0;3 cr.)

Introductory electronics course dealing with the property of basic electronic devices such as diodes, transistors, FETs and their circuit applications.

(Prerequisite ELEC 221)

ELEC 370 Electric Power and Machines (3,0;3 cr.)

Introductory course dealing with power distribution and electric machines.

(Prerequisite ELEC 221)

ELEC330L Electronic Circuits I Laboratory (0,2;1 cr.)

Designing, building, and testing electronic circuits which use Op-Amps, diodes, BJTs and FETs

(Co-requisite ELEC330)

ELEC 440 Microcomputers Design I (3,0;3 cr.)

RAM, ROM, and CPU architecture. Instruction set. Timing sequences. Sub-routines. Interrupts. Peripherals. Applications. System design.

(Prerequisite: ELEC 223)

ELEC 440L Microcomputers Design I Laboratory (0,3;3 cr.) s)

Hands-on design experience with micro-computer systems and applications including busses, interfaces, and in circuit emulation.

(Prerequisite : ELEC223)

ELEC 421 Electronics II (3,0;3 cr.)

Second course in electronics with particular emphasis on equivalent circuit representation and analysis of electronic analog and switching circuits and systems, their frequency response and behavior under feedback control.

(Prerequisite: ELEC 330, PHY211)

ELEC 421L Electronics II Laboratory (0,2;1 cr.)

Design and measurement experiments of advanced electronics, including applications of integrated circuits.

(Prerequisite: ELEC 330L)

ELEC499 Senior Projects/Internship (Code: ENG499) (3 cr.)

Supervised project/internship aimed at providing practical experience in some aspects of Electronics and Computer Engineering. Students are expected to complete a literature survey, project specification, critical analysis, and to acquire the necessary materials needed for their intended end product. The course includes: production of a professional report, design process and outcome, implementation and testing, verification and validation, and critical appraisal of the project, and a formal presentation.

(Prerequisite: Director’s permission)

ELEC501 Digital Logic Design (3,0;3 cr.)

Upper division course in system design using state-of-the-art digital integrated circuits and concepts leading to realization of practical digital electronic systems. VHDL based designs.

(Prerequisite: ELEC 223)

ELEC502 Introduction to Digital Electronics (3,0;3 cr.)

This course focuses on digital electronics. BJT as a switch, CMOS and other advanced logic-gate circuits, dada converters, switched capacitor filters, semiconductor memories. (Prerequisite: ELEC 223, ELEC 330)

ELEC 520 Microcomputers II (3,0;3 cr.)

Design of interfacing schemes of microcomputers such as video, disk, etc. and state-of-the-art hardware and software features of advanced microprocessors families. (Prerequisite: ELEC440)

ELEC522 Integrated Circuits and Systems (3,0;3 cr.)

Continuation of Electronics II with major emphasis on applications of electronic integrated circuits and design of analog, control, communication, and digital electronic systems.

(Prerequisite: ELEC421)

ELEC 522L Integrated Circuits and Systems Lab (0,4;2 cr.)

Laboratory experiments in integrated circuits, includes design of RF filters, analog systems, A/D and D/A systems.

(Co-requisite: ELEC522)

ELEC526 VLSI Digital Design (3,0;3 cr.)

Study of VLSI Design concepts in MOS/CMOS environment, CAD techniques, VLSI array processors and wave front array processors, and implementation of array processors.

(Prerequisite ELEC 522)

ELEC532 Electro-Optics Devices and Systems (3,0;3 cr.)

Introduction to optical devices and systems such as solid state laser systems, their applications in industry. Also holography, linear and non-linear optical modulation and demodulation concepts.

(Prerequisite: CNE460)

ELEC597 Seminar (2,2;3 cr.)

Problems in Electronics and Computer Engineering and results of ongoing research will be presented and discussed by invited experts.

(Prerequisite: Director’s permission)

ELEC598 Special Topics in Electronics and Computer Engineering (6,12;12 cr.)

This course will cover a particular topic, varying from semester to semester, in which there is particular student or staff interest.

(Prerequisite: Director’s permission)

ELEC599 Independent Studies in Electronics and Computer Engineering (3,6;6 cr.)

This independent course will cover a particular topic, varying from semester to semester, in which there is particular student or staff interest.

(Prerequisite: Director’s permission)

CNE340 Signals and Systems (3,0;3 cr.)

Study of electrical signals and linear systems. Introduction to probability, linear algebra, and complex calculus applications.

(Prerequisite: MATH 342)

CNE311 Electromagnetic Fields (3,0;3 cr.)

Static Electric Field, the Steady electric Current, Magnetic Field of Ferro magnetic materials. The relation between field and circuit theory. Waves and wave polarization, reflection, refraction, and diffraction.

(Prerequisites: PHY205, MATH 342)

CNE420 Analog Communication Systems (3,0;3 cr.)

An introductory course in the field of analog communication systems. Transmitters, receivers, and different modulation and demodulation techniques are studied. A basic requirement of noise is also included.

(Prerequisite: CNE340)

CNE420L Analog Communication Systems laboratory (0,4;2 cr.)

This laboratory covers the core material covered in the Communication Systems and Networks courses.

(Prerequisite: CNE 420)

CNE443 Antennas (3,0;3 cr.)

Introduction to linear antennas, linear arrays and aperture antennas. Far field pattern calculation and measurement techniques. 

(Prerequisite : CNE 420)

CNE460 Optical Communication Systems (3,0;3 cr.)

Use of fiber optics as a communication medium. Principles of fiber optics: mode theory, transmitters, modulators, sensors, detectors and demodulators, fiber data links. (Prerequisite: CNE 311, CNE 420)

CNE470 Wireless Communication Systems (3,0;3 cr.)

The course provides a foundation for understanding and building wireless networks. The course covers the history and future of wireless services, Basic definitions, cellular concepts, mobile radio propagation, modulation techniques, coding techniques, Multiple Access Techniques (analog, TDMA, CDMA, GSM,3G.).

(Prerequisite: CNE 420)

CNE499 Senior Projects/Internship (1,2;3 cr.)

Supervised project/internship aimed at providing practical experience in some aspects of Communications and Network Engineering. Students are expected to complete a literature survey, project specification, critical analysis, and to acquire the necessary materials needed for their intended end product. The course includes: production of a professional report, design process and outcome, implementation and testing, verification and validation, and critical appraisal of the project.

(Prerequisite: Director’s permission)

CNE512 Introduction to Digital Signal Processing (3,0;3 cr.)

This course will cover Z transform. Continuous and digital filters. Design of digital filters. Effects of finite register length in digital filters. Engineering applications of digital filters.

(Prerequisite: CNE 420)

CNE523 Digital Communication Systems I (3,0;3 cr.)

Course will consider most important aspects of digital communication systems such as noise related subjects, random signals, linear systems, and baseband digital modulation and multiplexing.

(Prerequisite: CNE 512, or permission of the instructor)

CNE530 RF Circuit Design (3,0;3 cr.)

This course focuses on the analysis and design of high-frequency electronic circuits, with emphasis on RF and Microwave circuits and components for communication systems. The course aims to enabling students to acquire hands-on experience in RF and Microwave circuit design and testing through the use of computer-aided design tools to simulate and analyze high frequency circuits.  Students have to build RF circuits as part of a course project, performing measurements on those circuits is part of an accompanying lab course.

 (Prerequisite: CNE 311and ELEC421 and permission of the instructor)

CNE530L RF Circuit Design Laboratory (0,2;1 cr.)

Hands-on experience in RF and Microwave circuit design and testing through the use of computer-aided design tools to simulate and analyze high frequency circuits.  Students have to build RF circuits as part of a course project, performing measurements on those circuits.

 (Co requisite: CNE 530)

CNE531 RF Circuit Design (3,0;3 cr.)

Continuation of CNE530 with emphasis on wireless active circuits design such as amplifiers, mixers, and diode detectors.

(Prerequisite: CNE 530)

CNE532 Microwave Engineering (3,0;3 cr.)

Microwave waveguides. Microwave tubes, microwave solid state devices, microwave integrated circuits, microwave enclosures.

(Prerequisite: CNE 311and ELEC421 and permission of the instructor)

CNE533 Field and Waves Engineering (3,0;3 cr.)

This course will cover concepts and theorems in fields and waves, analytic techniques for guided waves, radiation and scattering, numerical techniques for analysis of electrical devices, using digital computer.

(Prerequisite: CNE 311 ,CNE443)

CNE551 Digital Communication Systems II (3,0;3 cr.)

Course will consider more important aspects of digital communication systems such as matched filters, digital base and modulation, multiplexing, carrier digital modulation and error correction coding.

(Prerequisite: CEN 523 or permission of the instructor)

CNE560 Network Security (3,0;3 cr.)

Network Security requirements, number theory, steganography, encryption design principles and algorithms, message authentication and digital signature principles and designs, network system security design.

(Prerequisite: permission of instructor)

CNE571 Computer- Communication Network Engineering (3,0;3 cr.)

System engineering synthesis, analysis, and evaluation of computer communication networks. Network design, routing and flow control, telecommunication traffic engineering, transmission, switching, etc.

(Prerequisite: permission of the instructor)

CNE585 Computer Network Analysis and Design (3,0;3 cr.)

Covering methods and research issues in modeling and performance evaluation of computer networks, with applications on network capacity planning, cost analysis, and WAN/LAN design.

(Prerequisite: permission of the instructor)

CNE597 Seminar (2,2;3 cr.)

Problems in Communications and Network Engineering and results of ongoing research will be presented and discussed by invited experts.

(Prerequisite: Permission of the director)

CNE598 Special Topics in Communication and Network Engineering (6,12;12 cr.)

This course will cover a particular topic, varying from semester to semester, in which there is particular student or staff interest.

(Prerequisite: permission of director)

CNE599 Independent Studies in Communication and Network Engineering (3,6;6 cr.)

This independent course will cover a particular topic, varying from semester to semester, in which there is particular student or staff interest.

(Prerequisite: permission of director)

CCNA1 Networking Basics (3,1;3 cr.)

The intention of this course is to engage beginning students in the field of networking  to master certain basic concepts, perform entry-level tasks in the planning, design, installation, operation, and troubleshooting of Ethernet and TCP/IP networks.

CCNA2 Router & Routing Basics (3,1;3 cr.)

The course focuses on initial router configuration, Cisco IOS Software management, routing protocol configuration, TCP/IP, and access control lists (ACLs). Students will develop skills on how to configure a router, manage Cisco IOS Software, configure routing protocol on routers, and set the access lists to control the access to routers.

CCNA3 LAN Switching and Wireless (3,1;3 cr.)

Course topics include: hierarchical network supporting converged data for small and medium-sized business.  Describe Ethernet for 100/1000 Mbps LANs and the IEEE 802.3 standards, role of Vlans and trunking VLANs in a converged network, STP with loops, basic wireless LAN security.

CCNA4 Accessing the WAN (3,1;3 cr.)

The course describes the fundamental concepts of point-to-point serial communication, Frame Relay, authentication and encapsulation, Frame Relay permanent virtual circuit (PVC), including configuring and troubleshooting Frame Relay on a router serial interface and configuring a static Frame Relay map. Describe advanced concepts of Frame Relay technology in terms of enterprise WAN services, including subinterfaces, bandwidth, and flow control

CHM221 Organic Chemistry I (3,0;3 cr.)

An introduction to chemical bonding and atomic structure theory as it pertains to the chemistry of carbon compounds. Correlation between structure and reactivity of organic molecules followed by a systematic look at the various reaction types using reaction mechanisms as a tool for study. Concurrent registration in both lecture and laboratory is required.

(Prerequisite: IEP L6 & above)

CHM221L Organic Chemistry I Lab (0,2;1 cr.)

This laboratory covers the core material covered in the organic chemistry I courses (CHM 221). Concurrent registration in both lecture and laboratory is required. 

CHM303 General Biochemistry (3,0;3 cr.)

Chemistry of proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, and nucleic acids; principles of enzymology, metabolism, and bioenergetics.

(Prerequisite: CHM 221)

CHM303L Gen Biochemistry Lab (0,2;1 cr.)

This laboratory covers the core material covered in the General Biochemistry courses (CHM303). Concurrent registration in both lecture and laboratory is required. 

BME274 BME Modeling and Simulation (3,0;3 cr.)

Computer modeling of biomedical applications. Extensive use of Matlab and Simulink for modeling and analysis of biomedical phenomena.

(Prerequisites: MATH 202)

BME332 BME Transport (3,0;3 cr.)

This course provides an introduction to the concepts and methods of transport of energy, mass and momentum in human cells and tissues; emphasizing chemical and physical transport processes and applications towards the development of drug delivery systems, artificial organs, bioartificial organs, and tissue engineering.

(Prerequisites: BME274, CHM303)

BME352 BME Imaging (3,0;3 cr.)

This course is intended to inform students about the theory and operation of instruments used in the field if medical imaging. X-Ray machines, CT scanners, Ultrasound, MRI and Nuclear Medicine are studied in details.

(Prerequisites: BME332, CHM303)

BME358 Biomedical Instrumentation (3,0;3 cr.)

Studies of medical diagnostic instruments and techniques for the measurement of physiologic variables in living systems. Properties of biopotentials and other biological signals.Transducers and electrodes for biopotentials, chemical measurements, blood flow and pressure measurements, respiratory system measurements, temperature measurements, displacement measurements, force measurements, sound measurements, and data acquisition techniques. International standards for safety and performance of medical instruments.

(Prerequisite: BME370)

BME370 Eng. Analysis Biological Sys I (3,0;3 cr.)

A quantitative, model approach to physiological systems at the cellular and tissue level. Thermodynamic, biochemical and biophysical principles of the cell, general system anatomy and functionality.

(Prerequisites: BME274, CHM 303)

BME371 BME Data Evaluation Principles (3,0;3 cr.)

Design and analysis of clinical and biomedical experiments. Statistical process control and measuring performance relevant to medical device industry.

(Prerequisites: BME274, MATH 352)

BME401L BME Lab I (0,2;1 cr.)

Design, implementation and analysis of biomedical experiments, including biosignal data acquisition, processing and analysis, mass transport and medical image processing and interpretation.

(Prerequisites: BME 371)

BME402L BME Lab II (0,2;1 cr.)

Design, implementation and analysis of biomedical experiments, including biomechanics, tissue mechanics, fluid transport, cardiovascular hemodynamics, and mechanics and materials for artificial organs and implants.

(Prerequisites: BME 401L, BME371)

BME458 Principles of BME (3,0;3 cr.)

Design and regulations for medical devices, Further study of the scientific bases and design strategies for modern medical instruments. Real-time digital conditioning of biomedical monitored signals.

(Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission)

BME470 Engineering Analysis of Biomedical Systems II (3,0;3 cr.)

Quantitative description of physiological systems at the integrative system level. Includes engineering analysis relating design to organ function.

(Prerequisite: BME 370)

BME499 Senior Project/Internship (Code: ENG499) (2,2;3 cr.)

Supervised project/internship aimed at providing practical experience in some aspects of Biomedical Engineering. Students are expected to complete a literature survey, project specification, critical analysis, and to acquire the necessary materials needed for their intended end product. The course includes: production of a professional report, design process and outcome, implementation and testing, verification and validation, and critical appraisal of the project.

(Prerequisite: Director’s permission)

BME 515 Biomaterials Science (3,0;3 cr.)

Materials used in prostheses for skin and soft tissue, vascular implant devices, bone repair, and artificial joints. Structure-property relationships for biological tissue. (Prerequisites: PHY211 and BME 470)

BME 520 Cell and Tissue Engineering (3,0;3 cr.)

Physiology of cell growth and in vitro cultivation with basic techniques in biotechnology. Analysis of fundamental process and engineering approaches on in vitro models for tissue growth.

(Prerequisites: BME 332, BME 515, CHM 303)

BME 534 Introduction to Cardiovascular Engineering (3,0;3 cr.)

Quantitative cardiovascular physiology, engineering applied to cardiovascular system: mechanics, materials, transport, and design.

(Prerequisites: BME 332, BME 515, CHM 303)

BME 558 Bioradiation Engineering (3,0;3 cr.)

Spectrum of radiation sources, types of fields, properties of living tissue, mechanisms of field propagation in tissue. Applications in imaging and therapy, hazards and safety. (Prerequisite: CNE311 and Permission of the instructor)

BME 568 Engineering Foundation of Medical Imaging Instruments (3,0;3 cr.)

Engineering basis of medical imaging systems, including radiology, x-ray CT, SPECT, PET, MRI and ultrasound. Quality assurance of medical imaging systems.

(Prerequisite: BME358 and Permission of the instructor)

BME 569 Engineering Foundation of Radiation Therapy Instruments (3,0;3 cr.)

Engineering basis of radiation therapy instruments, calibration and quality assurance of these instruments and calculation of the radiation dose for radiation treatments.

(Prerequisite: BME352 and Permission of the instructor)

BME 579 Clinical Rotation in Radiation Oncology (3,0;3 cr.)

Practical calibration of radiation therapy instruments, dose calculation and planning of radiation treatment under supervision of certified medical physicist.

(Prerequisite: BME 569 and Permission of the instructor)

BME 585 Biotransport Processes (3 credits)

Transport of fluid, heat, and mass in the human body. Application to dialyzers and heart-lung devices.

(Prerequisites: BME 332 and Permission of the instructor)

BME597 Seminar (2,2;3 cr.)

Problems in Biomedical Engineering and results of ongoing research will be presented and discussed by invited experts.

(Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor)

BME598 Special Topics in Biomedical Engineering (6,12;12 cr.)

This course will cover a particular topic, varying from semester to semester, in which there is particular student or staff interest.

(Prerequisite: permission of instructor)

BME599 Independent Studies in Biomedical Engineering (3,6;6 cr.)

This independent course will cover a particular topic, varying from semester to semester, in which there is particular student or staff interest.

(Prerequisite: permission of instructor)

IE262 Enterprise Engineering (3,0;3 cr.)

Introduction to the industrial engineering role as enterprise system integrator. Systems concepts, modeling and analysis; integrated product/service and operational process design; productivity and quality improvement; computer technology insertion; project, operations, and global supply chain management. Prerequisite: sophomore standing

(Prerequisite: COMP 201 & CSC 263)

IE282 System Modeling and Optimization (3,0;3 cr.)

Problem solving using analytical models. Introduction to optimization, linear programming, integer, dynamic programming, and goal programming methods. Simplex method and sensitivity analysis. Practical applications using optimization software such as LINDO, LINGO, EXCEL SOLVER. Analytical decision making. Intro to stochastic programming.

(Prerequisite: IE 262)

IE302 Introduction to Ergonomics (3,2;4 cr.)

The measurement of human physical capabilities and limitations: anthropometry, biomechanics, work physiology. The human response to and measurement of the physical environment: heat, light, noise and vibration. Workplace, equipment and job design with regard to performance efficiency, health and safety. The human being as a consumer and generator of energy.

(Prerequisite: IE 282)

IE322 Fundamentals of Engineering Economy (3,0;3 cr.)

Introduction to concepts of economic analysis to optimize benefits utilizing multivariate, multistage mathematical models. Topics include cost and worth comparison, capital costs and sources, time value of money, replacement economics, taxes, economic efficiency of alternate designs, minimum costs and maximum benefits, risk and uncertainty and economics of work schedules.

(Prerequisite: IE 302)

IE 330 Design and Manufacturing I (3,2;4 cr.)

Dimensioning and tolerancing; tolerances-type, design and specification; assembly and fit design; tolerance standards; process planning-precedence representation in machining, operation and machine sequencing; jigs and fixtures-design and analysis; time and cost estimation for machining; automation; processes/system integration. Prerequisite: MS 202

IE 355 Engineering Experimental Design (3,0;3 cr.)

Fundamentals of design of experiments. Analysis of variance models for single factor designs with blocking factors and multi-factor designs, including factorial and nested designs. Fixed, random and mixed models. Analysis of covariance models.

(Prerequisite: MATH 352)

IE 411 Decision Support System for Industrial Engineers (3,0;3 cr.)

This course will cover principles and tools for developing decision support systems for solving industrial engineering problems. Tools that will be used are Microsoft Excel, Visual Basic for Excel, and Microsoft Access. The advanced features of Excel for data manipulation and presentation as well as optimization will be covered. The embedded Visual Basic language in Excel will be taught. Principles of database design will be studied together with Access software. The applications will cover a wide range of topics such as simulation, queuing, facility layout and warehousing, portfolio optimization, and MRP. At the end of the course the students should acquire basic skills to develop a small-scale but complete decision support system with Microsoft Office tools. Students are required to bring a laptop to the class to complete in-class exercises.

Prerequisite: IE 282, CSC 203, or permission of instructor.

IE 432 Production Systems and Operations (3,0;3 cr.)

Operations-oriented topics for production systems. Supply chain process (tactical planning, operational scheduling and sequencing, management and planning, demand promising). Customer service process; E-Business and information technology applications for production systems.              

Prerequisite: IE 282 and IE 330

IE 432 Production Systems and Operations (3,0;3 cr.)

Operations-oriented topics for production systems. Supply chain process (tactical planning, operational scheduling and sequencing, management and planning, demand promising). Customer service process; E-Business and information technology applications for production systems.              

Prerequisite: IE 282 and IE 330

IE 456 Quality Engineering (3,0;3 cr.)

The use of statistical methods for quality control and improvement in product and non-product environments for engineering and management utilization. Focus will be on statistical process control tools and total quality management.

Prerequisite: IE 355 and MATH 352

IE 483 Applied Research Methods (3,0;3 cr.)

Experimental methodology for empirical investigation, including problem formulation. The development and measurement of performance criteria, experimental and oral communication. The measurement of human performance is typically the vehicle used for students in this course.

(Prerequisite: IE 355 and IE 302)

IE499 Senior Projects/Internship (Code: ENG499) (3,0;3 cr.)

Supervised project/internship aimed at providing practical experience in some aspects of Industrial Engineering. Students are expected to complete a literature survey, project specification, critical analysis, and to acquire the necessary materials needed for their intended end product. The course includes: production of a professional report, design process and outcome, implementation and testing, verification and validation, and critical appraisal of the project.

(Prerequisite: Directors’ Approval)

IE526 Introduction to Expert Systems (3,0;3 cr.)

Introduction to the basic concepts, design and applications of expert systems. Specific topics include history of artificial intelligence, early applications, conventional programming versus knowledge engineering, languages, research problems, and engineering applications

IE530 Computer-Aided Manufacturing (2,2;3 cr.)

Computer applications to machines and processes in manufacturing systems. Numerical control principles, concepts of control theory as applied to numerical control, computer-assisted N/C programming (APT, Compact II, etc.), automated process planning, adaptive control and robotics. Prerequisite: IE330 or permission.

IE534 Reliability in Engineering Design (2,2;3 cr.)

Probabilistic reliability models for the lifetimes of manufactured components. Structure functions, system reliability calculations, lifetime distributions, models of dependence, parameter estimation, availability, maintainability, burn-in, preventive maintenance. Prerequisite: MATH 352 or permission of instructor.

IE535 Design of Quality Assurance Systems (3,0;3 cr.)

The methods of statistical quality control; industrial case studies; economics of quality control problems; problems of inspector error; principles of productivity and quality improvement; experimental design techniques to find assignable cause. Prerequisite: MATH 352

IE536 Facility, Planning, Warehousing, and Material Handling (3,0;3 cr.)

Facility location and layout models, design, analysis, and improvement of warehousing operations, material handling systems in manufacturing and warehousing operations, information technologies for management of operations, supply chain relationships. Prerequisite: IE 282

IE542 Advanced Engineering Economics (3,0;3 cr.)

Economic analysis under conditions of risk and uncertainty with particular emphasis on econometric models applied to engineering systems. Prerequisite: MATH 442

IE552 Applied Engineering Optimization (3,0;3 cr.)

Data mining techniques, heuristics and applications of operations research to financial engineering, site selection, transportation, transshipment and assignment problems. Routing techniques, facility layout models, queueing models and applications, Monte Carlo simulations and applications. Prerequisite: IE282 and MATH 352

IE561 Multicriteria Optimization (3,0;3 cr.)

Survey of developments and applications of theory and methods pertinent to decision making under conflicting criteria. Goal programming and interactive methods for multicriteria mathematical programming will be emphasized with applications. Prerequisite: IE 282.

IE596 Seminar (3,2;3 cr.)

Problems in Industrial Engineering and results of ongoing research will be presented and discussed by invited experts. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

IE597 Special Topics in Industrial Engineering (6,12;12 cr.)

This course will cover a particular topic, varying from semester to semester, in which there is particular student or staff interest. Prerequisite: permission of instructor

IE598 Independent Industrial Engineering (3,6;6 cr.)

This independent course will cover a particular topic, varying from semester to semester, in which there is particular student or staff interest. Prerequisite: permission of instructor

CIV 301 Geomatics (3, 0; 3 cr.)

Spatial data collection methods including surveying, photogrammetry, remote sensing, and global positioning systems; management, manipulation, and analysis of spatial and associated attribute data.  (Pre-requisites: COMP 201 and ( any 200 level MATH Course)

CIV 302 Civil Engineering Materials (3, 0; 3 cr.)

Physical, mechanical, and durability properties of concrete, metals, unreinforced and reinforced plastics, timber, asphalt, and asphalt concrete.

(Pre-requisites: PHY203)

CIV 303 Strength of Materials (3, 0; 3 cr.)

Stress and strain, axially loaded members, torsion of circular sections, bending of beams, transformation of stress and strain, and column buckling. 

(Pre-requisites: PHY203 and MATH 243)

CIV 304 Fluid Mechanics (3, 0; 3 cr.)

Elementary mechanics of fluids with emphasis on hydrostatics, control volume analysis of flowing fluids using kinematics, continuity, energy, and momentum principles; similitude, pipe flow.

(Pre-requisites: PHY203)

CIV 305 Structural Analysis (3, 0; 3 cr.)

Direct stiffness method of structural analysis; fundamentals and algorithms; numerical analysis of plane trusses, grids and frames; virtual work and energy principles; finite element method for plane stress and plane strain.

(Pre-requisites: CIV 303)

CIV 350 Environmental Systems I (3, 0; 3 cr.)

Environmental engineering issues associated with water, air, and land pollution, including risk assessment, groundwater contamination, global climate change, and sustainable technologies.

(Pre-requisites: GHN201)

CIV 410 Construction Engineering Management (3, 0; 3 cr.)

Fundamental concepts in planning, design, and construction of civil engineering projects. Introduction to project scheduling, cost estimating, controls, procurement, value engineering, quality assurance, and safety.

(Pre-requisites: CIV 301)

CIV 420 Hydraulic Engineering (3, 0; 3 cr.)

Applications of fluid mechanics to engineering and natural systems including fluid drag, open channel flow, turbomachinery, and environmental hydraulics; laboratory experiments; computational hydraulics.

(Pre-requisites: CIV 304)

CIV 430 Engineering Geology (3, 0; 3 cr.)

This is a course that discusses the composition and properties of rocks; geologic processes; geologic hazards; geologic structure and engineering consequences; terrain analysis and geologic mapping; interpretation and use of geologic maps; application of geology to engineering practice.

(Pre-requisites: PHY 211)

CIV 440 Geosystems Engineering (3, 0; 3 cr.)

Introduction to engineering behavior of soils; mechanical, chemical, electrical, and thermal properties; continuum design principles including theory of elasticity and limiting equilibrium applied to particulate soils.

(Pre-requisites: CIV 303)

CIV 450 Steel Structures I (3, 0; 3 cr.)

Introduction to the design of metal structures; behavior of members and their connections; theoretical, experimental, and practical bases for proportioning members and their connections.

(Pre-requisites: CIV 305)

CIV 460 Transportation Plan & Design (3, 0; 3 cr.)

Introduction to transportation engineering with specific emphasis on the planning, design, and operation of transportation facilities.

(Pre-requisites: CIV 301)

CIV 302L Concrete Mix Design Lab. (0, 3; 1 cr.)

Analysis of concrete quality mix and tests in Laboratory

CIV 303L Concrete Strength Test Lab. (0, 3; 1 cr.)

Analysis of concrete Strength and tests in Laboratory

CIV 350L Environmental Engineering Lab. (0, 3; 1 cr.)

Traditional analysis tools and techniques in analysis, control, and design of natural and engineered environmental systems including air, water, wastewater, solid and hazardous waste, and ecological systems.

CIV 480 Foundations Engineering (3, 0; 3 cr.)

Analysis and design of foundations, bearing capacity and settlement of foundations; stability of excavations and slopes; ground movements due to construction; analysis and design of excavations, retaining walls, slopes, and underground structures in soil and rock.

(Prerequisites: CIV 440)

CIV 480L Soil Gravel Asphalt Labs. (0, 3; 2 cr.)

Analysis of soil, gravel and asphalt in laboratory controlled environment.

CIV 300 Civil Engineering Systems (3, 0; 3 cr.)

Infrastructure viewed from a systems perspective; analytical approaches and modeling of civil-engineered facilities; sustainability; engineering economy applications.

(Pre-requisites: any 200 level MATH Course)

CIV 432 Hazardous Substance Engineering (3, 0; 3 cr.)

Technical aspects of hazardous waste management and treatment including legislation, exposure and risk assessment, contaminant fate and transport, waste treatment methods, and remediation technologies.

(Pre-requisites: CIV 304 and CIV 350)

CIV 439 Env Water Resources Dsgn (3, 0; 3 cr.)

Interdisciplinary design course in environmental engineering and water resources including process design, hydraulic design, reservoir operations and analysis, cost estimates, plans, and specifications. (Pre-requisites: CIV 420 and CIV 421 and CIV 431)

CIV 441 Geosystems Engr Design (3, 0; 3 cr.)

Analysis and design in geosystems engineering projects, including the evaluation of pile foundations, slope stability, earth-retaining structures, and embankments.

(Pre-requisites: CIV 440)

CIV 451 Structural Steel Dsgn (3, 0; 3 cr.)

Principles of behavior of tension and compression members, beams, and connections with application to the design of elementary structures.

(Pre-requisites: CIV 305)

CIV 454 Infrastructure Rehab (3, 0; 3 cr.)

Rehabilitation of civil infrastructure systems including aspects of deterioration science, nondestructive assessment, renewal engineering, construction planning and management, and public policy and finance.

(Pre-requisites: CIV 300 and CIV 303 and CIV 410)

CIV 455 Structural Analysis II (3, 0; 3 cr.)

Analysis of two- and three-dimensional statically indeterminate structures by classical and matrix methods of solution. Flexibility and stiffness techniques, influence lines, approximate analysis, and nonlinear analysis.

(Pre-requisites: CIV 305)

CIV 461 Multimodal Transport (3, 0; 3 cr.)

Planning, design, and operation of systems of air, rail, water, and highway facilities, including those for bicycles and pedestrians.

(Pre-requisites: CIV 460)

CIV 463 Computer-Aided Site Dsgn (3, 0; 3 cr.)

Site development principles and application to a comprehensive design project using computer-based digital terrain model software tools.

(Pre-requisites: CIV 460 and ENGR211)

CIV 472 Mech Behavior-Composites (3, 0; 3 cr.)

Stress-strain behavior of composites, property of matrix and reinforcing materials, mechanics of fiber-reinforced composites, lamina and laminate analysis, and mechanical performance. 

(Pre-requisites: CIV 303)

CIV 473 Composite Mater& Process (3, 0; 3 cr.)

Basic principles of selection and design of composite materials and their manufacturing and testing. Cost factors. Laboratory exercises on manufacturing and tests. 

(Pre-requisites: CHEM 200 and PHYS 211)

CIV 474 Composite Materials& Mfg (3, 0; 3 cr.)

Basic principles of selection and design of composite materials and their manufacturing and testing. Cost factors. Laboratory exercises on manufacturing and tests.

(Pre-requisites: PHYS 211)

CES 405 Reinforced Concrete I (3, 0; 3 cr.)

Strength, behavior, and design of reinforced concrete members subjected to moments, shear, and axial forces; emphasis on the influence of the material properties on behavior.

(Pre-requisites: CIV 305)

CES 463 Reinforced Concrete II (3, 0; 3 cr.)

Strength, behavior, and design of indeterminate reinforced concrete structures, with primary emphasis on slab systems; emphasis on the strength of slabs and on the available methods of design of slabs spanning in two directions, with or without supporting beams.

(Pre-requisites: CES 405)

CES 462 Steel Structures II (3, 0; 3 cr.)

Metal members under combined loads; connections, welded and bolted; moment-resistant connections; plate girders, conventional behavior, and tension field action. 3 undergraduate hours. 3 or 4 graduate hours.

(Prerequisites: CIV 450)

CES 442 Subsurface Character (3, 0; 3 cr.)

Introduction to field and laboratory methods for characterizing subsurface geological, hydrological, geotechnical, and contaminant conditions.

(Pre-requisites: CIV 440)

CES 467 Masonry Structures (3, 0; 3 cr.)

Analysis, design, and construction of masonry structures. Mechanical properties of clay and concrete masonry units, mortar, and grout. Compressive, tensile, flexural, and shear behavior of masonry structural components. Strength and behavior of unreinforced bearing walls. Detailed design of reinforced masonry beams, columns, structural walls with and without openings, and complete lateral-force resisting building systems.

(Pre-requisites: CIV 305)

CIV 453 Timber & Masonry Design (3, 0; 3 cr.)

Stress-based design of tension, compression, and flexural members; design of building systems, unreinforced and reinforced walls using timber and masonry construction materials and techniques. (Pre-requisites: CIV 305)

CES 560 Steel Structures III (3, 0; 3 cr.)

Theories of ultimate behavior of metal structural members with emphasis on buckling and stability of members and frames; theory of torsion applied to beam torsion, lateral-torsional buckling, curved beams with emphasis on design criteria; post-buckling strength of plates and post-buckling versus column behavior.

(Prerequisites: CES 462)

CES 472 Structural Dynamics I (3, 0; 3 cr.)

Analysis of the dynamic response of structures and structural components to transient loads and foundation excitation; single-degree-of-freedom and multi-degree-of-freedom systems; response spectrum concepts; simple inelastic structural systems; systems with distributed mass and flexibility. (Pre-requisites: CIV 450)

CES 572 Earthquake Engineering (3, 0; 3 cr.)

Source mechanisms, stress waves, and site response of earthquake shaking; effect on the built environment; nature of earthquake actions on structures; fundamental structural response characteristics of stiffness, strength, and ductility; representation of the earthquake input in static and dynamic structural analysis; modeling of steel and concrete structures under earthquake effects; outputs for safety assessment; comprehensive source-to-design actions project.

(Pre-requisites: CIV 450)

CES 468 Prestressed Concrete (3, 0; 3 cr.)

Strength, behavior, and design of prestressed reinforced concrete members and structures, with primary emphasis on pretensioned, precast construction; emphasis on the necessary coordination between design and construction techniques in prestressing.

(Pre-requisites: CES 405)

TRAN 406 Pavement Design I (3, 0; 3 cr.)

Analysis, behavior, performance, and structural design of highway flexible and rigid pavements; climate factors, drainage, traffic loading analysis, and life cycle cost analysis.

(Pre-requisites: CIV 440)

TRAN 506 Pavement Design II (3, 0; 3 cr.)

Development of layered elastic and plate theory models for area analysis of pavement systems; performance prediction of flexible and rigid pavements; characterization of aircraft traffic; design of airfield pavement systems; construction material fatigue and failure criteria (strength theory and fracture mechanics); industrial floor and reinforced concrete slab design; climatic factors.

(Pre-requisites: CIV 440)

TRAN 407 Airport Design (3, 0; 3 cr.)

Highway classification; analysis of factors in developing a transportation facility; highway geometrics design and safety standards; roadway design element; human factors in roadway design; roadway location principles; intersection, interchange, and ramp design; drainage factors.

(Pre-requisites: CIV 440)

TRAN 416 Traffic Capacity Analysis (3, 0; 3 cr.)

Fundamentals of traffic engineering; analysis of traffic stream characteristics; capacity of urban and rural highways; design and analysis of traffic signals and intersections; traffic control; traffic impact studies; traffic accidents.

(Pre-requisites: CIV 460)

TRAN 515 Traffic Flow Theory (3, 0; 3 cr.)

Fundamentals of traffic flow, traffic flow characteristics, statistical distributions of traffic flow parameter, traffic stream models, car following models, continuum follow models, shock wave analysis, queuing analysis, traffic flow models for intersections, network flow models and control, traffic simulation.

(Pre-requisites: CIV 460, MATH 352)

TRAN 517 Traffic Signal Systems (3, 0; 3 cr.)

Theory and application of concepts in traffic signal systems control, signal timing design, signal cabinet components, signal controllers, traffic signal theory and control, vehicle detection technologies, communication methods, interconnected rail-highway crossing signals, signal coordination, and signal systems network. Field trips to observe or utilize equipment in the Traffic Control.

(Pre-requisites: CIV 460, MATH 352)

ENV 450 Environmental Systems II (3, 0; 3 cr.)

Fundamental concepts of uncertainty, risk, and reliability applied to environmental and water resources decision making. Chance constraints, Markov and Monte Carlo modeling, geostatistics, unconditional and conditional simulation, genetic algorithms, neural networks, simulated annealing, and a review of relevant portions of basic probability and statistical theory. Many techniques are applied to a real-world environmental decision making problem initially developed in CIV 350.

(Pre-requisites: CIV 350)

ENV 462 Environmental Impact Assessment (3, 0; 3 cr.)

Key policy, planning, and methodological issues in the environmental impact assessment of engineering systems including the regulatory framework and analytical techniques.

( Pre-requisites: CIV 350)

ENV 421 Surface Hydrology (3, 0; 3 cr.)

Descriptive and quantitative hydrology dealing with the distribution, circulation, and storage of water on the earth’s surface; principles of hydrologic processes; methods of analysis and their applications to engineering and environmental problems.

(Pre-requisites: CIV 420)

ENV 422 Groundwater (3, 0; 3 cr.)

Physical properties of groundwater and aquifers, principles and fundamental equations of porous media flow and mass transport, well hydraulics and pumping test analysis, role of groundwater in the hydrologic cycle, groundwater quality and contamination.

(Pre-requisites: CIV 420)

ENV 423 Open-Channel Hydraulics (3, 0; 3 cr.)

Advanced hydraulics of free surface flow in rivers and open channels; discussion of theory, analytical and numerical solution techniques, and their applications to gradually and rapidly varied nonuniform flows, unsteady flow, and flow in open-channel networks.

(Pre-requisites: CIV 420)

ENV 424 Waste Water Management (3, 0; 3 cr.)

Reclamation of water and wastewater for potable and industrial uses, groundwater remediation. Principles of physical, chemical, and biological treatment processes.

(Pre-requisites: CIV 350)

ENV 425 Water Quality Engineering (3, 0; 3 cr.)

Fundamental theory underlying the unit processes utilized in the treatment of water for domestic and industrial usage, and in the treatment of domestic and industrial wastewaters. 

(Pre-requisites: ENV462)

ENV 426 Surface Water Quality Modeling (3, 0; 3 cr.)

Mathematical modeling of the movement and fate of pollutants and other substances in streams, lakes, and other natural water bodies. Development of one-, two-, and three-dimensional differential conservation equations, one-, two-, and three-dimensional steady-state and transient solutions. Finite difference, finite element, and finite particle methods. Lagrangian and Eulerian formulations, diffusion and dispersion tensors, numerical dispersion, and solution stability. Kinetic relationships describing important physical, chemical, and biochemical water constituent transformation phenomena. Field or laboratory experiment in model calibration and verification.

(Pre-requisites: ENV 462, MATH452)

ENV 431 Air Pollution Engineering (3, 0; 3 cr.)

Introduction to the physical and chemical processes affecting the dynamics and fate of air pollutants at the local, regional, and global scales. Particular emphasis is on tropospheric pollutant chemistry and transport.

(Pre-requisites: CIV 350)

ENV 432 Air Quality Engineering (3, 0; 3 cr.)

Description and application of chemical and physical principles related to air pollutants, aerosol mechanics, attenuation of light in the atmosphere, air quality regulation, generation of air pollutants, methods to remove gaseous and particulate pollutants from gas streams, and atmospheric dispersion. (Pre-requisites: CIV 350)

ENV 433 Air Quality Control (3, 0; 3 cr.)

Application of principles describing the generation, separation, and removal of air contaminants from gas streams generated by stationary sources. Typically includes local field trips to observe applications of the air quality control devices.

(Pre-requisites: ENV 431)

ENV 443 Environmental Geo-technics (3, 0; 3 cr.)

Chemical equilibria and partitioning in subsurface systems; hazardous waste site assessment technologies and data; including soil gas data, monitoring wells, and direct-push technology.

(Pre-requisites: CIV 440)