Marine Engineering and Technology Course Description

ENG 201 Academic English I (3,0;3 cr.)

The course develops students’ communication skills that are needed in an academic context. Students are offered instruction and training in analytical reading and writing of expository and argumentative texts and essays, as well as note-making, summarizing and outlining from readings.

(Prerequisite: TOEFL of 550 or above)

PDS 201 Personal Development Skills (1,0;1 cr.)

This course will provide an introduction to the essentials of effective informative public speaking. It will help students develop creativity as speakers by gaining basic competence in the preparation and delivery of spoken reports or other informative presentations. Moreover, it will introduce the student to research methods in business administration. Research techniques, research design, sampling, data gathering and questionnaire development are covered.

(Prerequisite: ENG201)

ENG203 Marine English I (2,0;2 cr.)

The course is designed to provide rigorous training in reading comprehension, synthesis, critiquing, and research skills. The course encourages advanced independent research as well as writing and discussion, and facilitates student’s self-expression.

(Prerequisite: ENG201)

ENG204 Marine English II (2,0;2 cr.)

The course is designed to provide rigorous training in reading comprehension, synthesis, critiquing, and research skills. The course encourages advanced independent research as well as writing and discussion, and facilitates student’s self-expression.

(Prerequisite: ENG203)

MATH 202 Calculus III (3,0;3 cr.)

Techniques of integration; improper integrals.  Infinite series; Taylor and Maclaurin series.  Parameterized curves and polar coordinates; Graphing and integration in polar coordinates; Analytic geometry in space; Vector-valued functions; space curves, curvature. 

(Prerequisite: IEP L6 and above)

MATH 203M Calculus IV (2,0;2 cr.)

Analytical geometry in three dimensions.  Algebra and operations on vectors, Limits, continuity, derivatives of functions in several variables and Multiple Integrals. Vector calculus; Functions of several variables; Partial derivatives, Gradients;  Extreme values and differentials of multivariate functions; Multi integrals; Line and surface integrals.

(Prerequisite: MATH202)

MATH 342 Ordinary Differential Equations (3,0;3 cr.)

Introduces first order differential equations, linear differential equations, homogenous and non-homogenous equations with constant coefficients, power series solutions, Bessel functions, Legendre polynomials, Laplace transforms, and initial value problems.

(Prerequisite: MATH202

PHY 203 Physics I: Mechanics (3,0;3 cr.)

Vector representation of forces and moments; general three-dimensional theorems of statics; free bodies; two-and three-dimensional statically determinate frames; centroids and moments of inertia of areas. Absolute motion of a particle; motion of rigid bodies; rotating axes and the Coriolis component of acceleration; Newton’s laws applied to translating and rotating rigid bodies; principles of work and energy and impulse and momentum in translation and rotation; moments of inertia of masses.

(Prerequisite MATH 202)

PHY 205 Physics II: Electromagnetics and Optics (3,0;3 cr.)

Simple Harmonic Motion, oscillations, and waves. Charge, electric field, Gauss’ Law and potential. Capacitance, resistance, simple A/C and D/C circuits. Magnetic fields, Ampere’s Law, Faraday’s Law, and induction. Maxwell’ equations and electromagnetic waves

(Prerequisite MATH 202, MATH 342)

PHY 223 Physics III: Thermodynamics and Modern Physics (3,0;3 cr.)

Temperature, first and second laws of thermodynamics, kinetic theory and entropy. Gratings and spectra, polarization. Light and quantum physics, wave nature of matter, structure of the hydrogen atom. Atomic physics, electrical conduction in solids, nuclear physics and particle physics.

(Prerequisite MATH 202, MATH 342)

PHY309 Engineering mechanics II (3,0;3 cr.)

Newton’s laws, one dimensional motion, vector methods kinematics, dynamics, conservation laws, and the kepler problem. Collisions, systems of particles and rigid-body motion. Approximation technique, lagrangian and Hamiltonian formulations of classical mechanics, small oscillations.

(Prerequisite: PHY203)

PHY211 Material Science (3,0;3 cr.)

The behavior of materials under various conditions and environments is correlated to atomic and molecular structure and bonding. 

(Prerequisites: MATH 202, MATH 342)

MT112T Marine Safety (2,1;2 cr.)

This course raises the standard and efficiency of seafarers. Topics covered: Knowledge for ship handling and the effect of propellers, Familiarity with the duties of officer on watch at sea and securing watches at ports, Strength of material calculation with regard to cargo gear lifting equipment, Regulation and inspection anchors and cables, anchor works and ship maintenance. This course enables the students to know the necessary basic knowledge of the strategy of combating oil spill, and the tactics of combating and reducing the pollution when it occurs.

(Prerequisite: None)

CHM202 Chemical Engineering Technology (2,0;2 cr.)

The Science of chemistry and its close relation with other branches of sciences. Thechnological applications of these sciences which emerge in the mineral oil, medication, chemical textile and other industries  Also included are topics of specialized chemical Engineering Technology applications.

(Prerequisites: None)

ME231 Applied Thermodynamics (3,0;3 cr.)

The course is designed to identify various aspects and areas of thermodynamics in order to put the student in the right position to solve the simple problems related to refrigeration and heating.

(Prerequisite: PHY223)

COMP 201 Computer Applications (2,2;3 cr.)

The course introduces the student to the microcomputer application packages which are available in the market and are needed by the student in his/her course of study. The main software applications covered are the Microsoft Office products such as word for word processing, Excel for designing use of spreadsheet, PowerPoint for presentation design.

(Prerequisite: IEP L4 & above)

CSC 203 Programming Structures and Abstractions (2,2;3 cr.)

The course introduces basic concepts of systems programming. Students learn to apply basic programming concepts toward solving problems, create source files and header files, work with and effectively use basic data types, compile source code into binary executable files, and understand use of the “make” utility for project management. Currently this course will introduce basic concepts of procedural programming in C++, which also largely apply to the C programming language with appropriate differences discussed.

(Prerequisite: COMP201)

ADF112 Eng. Drawing & Descriptive Geometry (3,0;3 cr.)

This course focuses on how to implement drawing techniques employed in design. It stresses drawing as clear communication and covers the proper use of lines, graphic layout for presentation, lettering dimensioning, title blocks, orthographic projection, perspective renderings and multi-views. Emphasis is placed on drawing with multiple media and collage. Students will also explore various themes and subjects, such as human figure, landscape, or still life.

(Prerequisites: ADF111)

IM111 Industry Relations (3,0;3 cr.)

Introduction to properties of engineering materials, production of common metals. Types of manufacturing firms. Basic manufacturing process, casting forming welding and machining. An overview of manufacturing processes. Precision measurement and quality assurance.

(Prerequisite: none)

ELEC221 Electric Circuits I (3,0;3 cr.)

The course covers dc and ac topics; Ohm’s law, energy and power, series and parallel circuits, circuit theorems, capacitors, inductors, transformers, RC and RL circuits, RLC circuits, Filters, circuit theorems in AC analysis, and pulse response of reactive circuits. 

(Prerequisite MATH202)

ADF113 Mechanical Engineering Drawing (3,0;3 cr.)

This course provides an introduction to the principles of color and an exploration of color theory, color vocabulary, and mixing systems as they relate to design. The historical, cultural, and psychological aspects of color will also be examined.

(Prerequisite MATH202

IM212 Manufacturing processes

Ship type machining processes, Cutting tools, Work holding devices. Mechanics of ship formation. Analytical study of machining processes, tool wear, process accuracy and produced surface finish. Precision measurements and meteorology. Overview of no conventional machining processes.

(Prerequisite: IM111)

EE218 Instrument and Measurement

Introduction to instrumentation and the principal physical measurable quantities. Measurable quantities. Measurement of pressure. Temperature measurement. Level measurement. Flow measurement. Other miscellaneous measurements. Different control components: comparators, sensors, transducers, amplifiers and actuators.

MM221 Marine Diesel Engine

4-Stroke and 2-stroke diesel engine. Diesel engine parts. System of M.D.E, supercharging. Marine fuel. Lubricating oil. Characteristics of combustion in M.D.E. Engine preparation and starting. Power Calculation.

(Prerequisite: ME231)

MM241 Naval Architecture & Ship Construction

Merchant ship types. Principal dimensions. Ship stresses. Shipbuilding materials. Framing systems. Ship structural items. Typical midship sections. Displacement & coefficient of form. Calculations of area and volume. Center of gravity. Stability of ships. Ship resistance and propellers.

MM211 Marine engineering

Introduction to marine engineering, types of marine power plants, introduction to marine auxiliary engines, transmission of power through propulsion systems, thrust bearing, shafting, shaft bearing, stern tube, propeller, different types of pumps, displacement and retodynamic, construction, performance, characteristics, heat exchangers, central cooling systems.

Marine Transport and Technology Course Description

ENG 201 Academic English I (3,0;3 cr.)

The course develops students’ communication skills that are needed in an academic context. Students are offered instruction and training in analytical reading and writing of expository and argumentative texts and essays, as well as note-making, summarizing and outlining from readings.

(Prerequisite: TOEFL of 550 and above)

PDS 201 Personal Development Skills (1,0;1 cr.)

This course will provide an introduction to the essentials of effective informative public speaking. It will help students develop creativity as speakers by gaining basic competence in the preparation and delivery of spoken reports or other informative presentations. Moreover, it will introduce the student to research methods in business administration. Research techniques, research design, sampling, data gathering and questionnaire development are covered.

(Prerequisite: ENG201)

COMP 201 Computer Applications (2,2;3 cr.)

The course introduces the student to the microcomputer application packages which are available in the market and are needed by the student in his/her course of study. The main software applications covered are the Microsoft Office products such as word for word processing, Excel for designing use of spreadsheet, PowerPoint for presentation design.

(Prerequisite: ENG 014 & above)

CSC 203 Programming Structures and Abstractions (2,2;3 cr.)

The course introduces basic concepts of systems programming. Students learn to apply basic programming concepts toward solving problems, create source files and header files, work with and effectively use basic data types, compile source code into binary executable files, and understand use of the “make” utility for project management. Currently this course will introduce basic concepts of procedural programming in C++, which also largely apply to the C programming language with appropriate differences discussed.

(Prerequisite: COMP201)

MATH 202 Calculus III (3,0;3 cr.)

Techniques of integration; improper integrals.  Infinite series; Taylor and Maclaurin series.  Parameterized curves and polar coordinates; Graphing and integration in polar coordinates; Analytic geometry in space; Vector-valued functions; space curves, curvature. 

(Prerequisite:ENG 016 and above)

MATH 203M Calculus IV (2,0;2 cr.)

Analytical geometry in three dimensions.  Algebra and operations on vectors, Limits, continuity, derivatives of functions in several variables and Multiple Integrals. Vector calculus; Functions of several variables; Partial derivatives, Gradients;  Extreme values and differentials of multivariate functions; Multi integrals; Line and surface integrals.

(Prerequisite: MATH202)

PHY 203 Physics I: Mechanics (3,0;3 cr.)

Vector representation of forces and moments; general three-dimensional theorems of statics; free bodies; two-and three-dimensional statically determinate frames; centroids and moments of inertia of areas. Absolute motion of a particle; motion of rigid bodies; rotating axes and the Coriolis component of acceleration; Newton’s laws applied to translating and rotating rigid bodies; principles of work and energy and impulse and momentum in translation and rotation; moments of inertia of masses.

(Prerequisite MATH 202)

PHY 205 Physics II: Electromagnetics and Optics (3,0;3 cr.)

Simple Harmonic Motion, oscillations, and waves. Charge, electric field, Gauss’ Law and potential. Capacitance, resistance, simple A/C and D/C circuits. Magnetic fields, Ampere’s Law, Faraday’s Law, and induction. Maxwell’ equations and electromagnetic waves

(Prerequisite MATH 202, MATH 342)

MT111 Seamanship Principles (3,0;3 cr.)

This course gives the trainee information of seamanship techniques. Topics covered are: The main types of ship, uses of each type, introduction of various specifications department and equipment on board, manning of merchant ships, load line marks, location and benefit, principles of ship’s maintenance, ropes and wires, navigation equipment.  Also covered are certain IMO model courses: 1.19 Personal survival and model course: 1.20 Basic Fire Fighting, and First Aid

(Prerequisite: None)

MT131 Introduction to Navigation (2,0;2 cr.)

The course introduces students to the Earth’s coordinates, definitions, great circles, small circles, spherical angles, earth’s poles, equator meridians& latitude and longitude, nautical mile, cable and knot. Charts, charts projections, Mercator chart, chart corrections and notices to marines. It also encompasses Gyro course, compass course, compass correction, true, magnetic and compass north, deviation and variation, compass errors, the distance, distance between two positions on a Mercator chart, Position lines and Publication (list of light, chart5011and chart catalogue)

(Prerequisite: None)

MM141 Marine Engineering (1,0;1 cr.)

The goal of this course is to introduce students to the engineering knowledge of instruments and control systems on board of ships. Describing the engine room lay out and the principle of operation of main engine, auxiliary machinery and ship systems.

(Prerequisite: ENG 016 & above)

MT112 Marine Safety (3,1;3 cr.)

This course raises the standard and efficiency of seafarers. Topics covered: Knowledge for ship handling and the effect of propellers, Familiarity with the duties of officer on watch at sea and securing watches at ports, Strength of material calculation with regard to cargo gear lifting equipment, Regulation and inspection anchors and cables, anchor works and ship maintenance. This course enables the students to know the necessary basic knowledge of the strategy of combating oil spill, and the tactics of combating and reducing the pollution when it occurs.

(Prerequisite: MT111)

MT121 Ship Construction (2,0;2 cr.)

This course aims at improving the understanding of how to read and use ship’s technical drawings plans, to recognize the features of different parts of the ship and the stresses that may be subjected to ship, and ship’s life span.  It enables students to read and understand ship’s plans, recognize the differences between building systems, the construction features of bottom, ends, deck and rudders, the features for achieving fire integrity and water tightness, Load line.

MT132 Terrestrial navigation I (3,0;3 cr.)

Topics covered: sailing, plan parallel, traverse, middle latitude and Mercator sailing. Lights, nominal, luminous and geographical ranges. Vertical and horizontal sextant angles. The nautical chart, deal reckoning, estimated position, the fixed position. Direction measurement by magnetic and gyro compasses, errors, determining the ship’s position by the use of: (1) Land marks. (2) Aids to navigation, including lighthouses, beacons and buoys.

(Prerequisite: MT131)

MT213 Watch Keeping (2,0;2 cr.)

This course provides the background knowledge to support: collision avoidance, buoyage systems. It covers the main duties of officer of the watch (oow) during a navigational watch. It also introduces the students to the pollution prevention.

MT233 Terrestrial Navigation II (3,0;3 cr.)

The course goals are: The determination of the ship’s position by the use of dead reckoning taking into account winds, tidal streams, current and speed by log. Application of the theory of tides and tidal factors. Evaluation of the height of tide in the main standard ports. Problems of how to find the actual depth and actual height, grounding, passing over shoals and under bridges.

(Prerequisite: MT132.)

MT234 Celestial Navigation (3,0;3 cr.)

The concept of the celestial sphere. System of coordinates. Projection of the celestial sphere on horizon/meridian and equinoctial planes. The apparent diurnal motion of the heavenly bodies. The apparent annual motion of the true sun and its affects the day and night phenomena. The apparent motion of planets and the moon. The concept of time phenomena and keeping (saving) time aboard ships. Equation of time. Basis of reckoning zone time.  Extraction of data from nautical almanac tables. The spherical triangle PZX and its solution knowing HA, Dec and Latitude to obtain C.Z.D. and true bearing for heavenly bodies. Intercept method for obtaining the astronomical position line. Compass error by time and amplitude methods.

(Prerequisite: MATH203)

MT222 Ship Stability (2,0;2 cr.)

The course is established in accordance with the requirements of the STCW 95 convention, under the competence of “maintain sea worthiness of the ship”. It provides students with necessary basic knowledge of ship stability and enables them to deal with the curves and tables of hydrostatic data. The course provides students with the skills necessary to put the vessel under favorable condition and ideal stability of leading discharging and sea passage. The course also enables students to assess the ship stability condition. These objectives are achieved by understanding the working knowledge and application of transverse and longitudinal stability and actions to be taken in cases of partial loss of buoyancy.

MT261 Ship Compasses and Auto Pilot (3,0;3 cr.)

This model course provides the background knowledge to support the basic theory of the earth’s magnetism and condition that lead to errors in the indication of heading.  A free gyroscope and how it can be made north seeking and a familiar gyro compass. Ability to determine errors of magnetic and gyro compass using celestial and terrestrial means. Steering control system.  Automatic pilot and rate of turn indicator.

ENG204 Maritime English (3, 0; 3 cr.)

The course is designed to provide rigorous training in reading comprehension, synthesis, critiquing, and research skills. The course encourages advanced independent research as well as writing and discussion, and facilitates student’s self-expression.

(Prerequisite: ENG201)

MT215 Marine Communication (3,0;3 cr.)

Students will know the procedure set out in the international code of signals & how to make use of the publication. They will also know the procedures to use in radiotelephone communications & be able to use radiotelephones, particularly with respect to distress, urgency, safety & navigational messages.

MT251 Cargo handling (3,0;3 cr.)

The course gives trainees the basic knowledge about loading various types of cargo such as: general cargo, container, reefer cargo& hazardous goods, also the preparation of cargo holds for receiving various types of cargo, proper lashing procedures for prevention of ship cargo damage. 1-2 visits to port for trainees to watch the cargo cranes while loading& unloading.

MT281 Meteorology (3,0;3 cr.)

This course provides the background knowledge to support composition, nature & processes of the atmosphere. Atmospheric pressure & pressure systems. Wind & air masses. Meteorological instruments & observation. Weather associated with synoptic system.  This course enables the students to know the necessary basic knowledge of atmosphere and its physical processes, this course includes the composition and the atmosphere, heat exchange in the atmosphere clouds formation, precipitation winds, visibility as well as the hydrometers (fog, mist, dew, frost, and precipitation)

This course enables the students to know necessary basic knowledge of pressure system and meteorological instruments. This course includes the meteorological instruments and their corrections, also includes local and serve winds, the pressure systems, the general circulation of pressure and wind as well as air masses classification and fronts (warm front, cold front, occulted front).

MT214 Ship Handling and Emergency Procedure ( 3,0;3 cr.)

This model course provides the background knowledge to support: Marine pollution prevention & MERSAR, Emergency procedures, Turning circle and ship maneuvering, Anchoring & mooring.

MT235 Voyage Planning & Weather Routing (3,0;3 cr.)

On completion of the training and assessment, trainees should be competent to carry out voyage planning (coastal and ocean), the use of admiralty publication in voyage planning, weather routing and performance standards for electronic charts.

MT262 Radar& ARPA (3,0;3 cr.)

The basic Theory and operation of a marine radar system which includes the fundamental principles of radar, characteristics of radar sets and factors affecting performance. Setup and operate radar in accordance with manufacturer’s instructions and how to measure ranges and bearings. Manual radar plotting and construction,  the relative motion triangle to determine course, speed and aspects of other ships, Determine CPA and TCPA.Use to ensure safe navigation, fix vessel’s position by radar and using parallel indexing in radar navigation. Use of radar to avoid collisions or close encounters.ARPA system display characteristic and IMO. Performance standards for ARPA, Acquisition of targets: tracking capabilities and limitations. Operate an ARPA system, errors of interpretation of target data, errors in displayed data identified and explained and system operational testes to determine data accuracy.

(Prerequisite: MT162)

MT263 Navigation Aid (3,0;3 cr.)

The course offers the basic Theory of Electronic Navigation Aids such as Loran-C System, Satellite Navigation System (GPS & Glonass). The principle of EPRIB. The principle of Echo Sounders and Method of Recording & Displaying the information.  The concept of speed measurement (Water & Ground Reference).

(Prerequisite: MT162)

MT282 Marine Physics (3,0;3 cr.)

The Oceans, sea floor features, physical properties of seawater: temperature, salinity, pressure, density. Buoyancy. Ocean circulation: wind driven current, density current. Tides: classification, tide generating force, spring and neap tides, tidal harmonic constituents tidal streams, tidal datum, sea level Oscillation, tidal prediction tables and software.  Waves: wave types, generation and growth of wind waves. Sea and swell. Wave forecasting. Seiches, storm surge, trunami. Wind, current and waves on ships. Wave transformation in shallow water: wave shoaling, refraction, diffraction, reflection and breaking. EM Radiation. Optic properties of sea water, seawater color, light absorption, scattering. Optic applications. Acoustic properties of sea water. Sound speed in seawater, Shadow zones. Sound Channel. Echo sounder and side-scan sonar.

(Prerequisite: PHY203, PHY205)

MT291 Maritime law& IMO conventions (3,0;3 cr.)

This course deals in an elementary way with all the aspects of the law those engaged in management are likely to meet. The student must know the introduction of the law, the ship, and the identification marks of the ship, the maritime persons and their duties, the maritime lien, principles of maritime collision and salvage and some conventions related to the maritime law.

ENG205 Technical report writing (2,0;2 cr.)

This is an advanced course in report writing. The course provides the student of term 4 with intensive training in the mechanics of writing reports. IMO marine accidents investigation reports are included with a view to providing models of reports about miscellaneous marine accidents. Library readings constitute an integral part of the course. Academic conventions related to report layout are fully covered.

(Prerequisite: ENG204)